Tag Archives: stewardship

“The Best Is Yet To Come”

A little girl climbed onto her great-grandmother’s lap. She looked at the old woman’s snowy white hair, then at the many wrinkles that lined her face. “Great-Grandma, did God make you?”

“Yes,” the old saint replied.

“Did God make me too?”

“Yes, dear.”

“Well,” said the little girl, “don’t you think He’s doing a better job now than He used to?”

I chuckle at that story, knowing that the little girl hadn’t yet learned that these physical bodies of ours are temporary, and are unable to hide the signs of wear and tear that come with age. She would eventually come to understand that her great-grandma didn’t start off old. It wouldn’t take long to discover that it was time that had carved those wrinkles and had taken the color from her great-grandma’s hair.

As a writer, I know that I only have a limited amount of time to write. And my readers are dealing with the same dilemma. I pray that the stories I write will draw them closer to the God that loves them. If I can urge someone to journey on with renewed strength toward heaven, then I’ve used my time wisely. If I write books that stir readers to a renewed commitment to the Lord, then it’s been time well spent. More than anything in this world–whether in preaching, teaching, or writing–I want to communicate that a God of love and mercy is knowable here, and invites us all into His hereafter.

No one will stumble into heaven accidentally.

That makes the call to write an important task. Time is limited to help point people in the right direction.

Can Christian fiction carry out this task?

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Filed under Christian Fiction, Christian Growth, Christian Life, reading, Uncategorized, Writing

If the Declaration of Independence were written today

The worldview of the author shapes what he or she writes. So as I look around at the humanistic mindset that fuels our society, I shudder to think of what the Declaration of Independence would look like if written or revised by our pagan leaders of this era. I submit it might begin something like this:

When in the course of human events (although there is nothing superior about the animal known as “human”), it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another (those disbanding should apologize for their intolerance and out-dated morality), and to assume amoung the Powers of the earth (i.e. United Nations), the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature (Evolution and Global Warming) and of Nature’s God entitle them (pick your “god” and your entitlements), a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare (but not in a way that would be offensive) the causes (extremism) which impel them to the separation.

We hold (loosely) these truths (tested in focus groups and subject to change without notice) to be self-evident (unless they are not politically expedient), that all men (animals, plants, glaciers, and ozone layers) are created (empowered by indoctrination) equal (unless they are Christians), that they are endowed by their Creator (Federal Government) with certain unalienable (no offense to illegal aliens) Rights (as shall be determined by the Supreme Court and/or the United Nations General Assembly), that amoung these are Life (once you escape the womb), Liberty (freedom from responsibility or accountability) and the pursuit of Happiness (as defined by your inner desires and not shackled by organized religion).

Yes, what we write is most certainly colored by the lens through which we view the world. As a Christian, I write stories that are informed by my belief in God. I recognize–even if imperfectly–the power of words and their ability reach people emotionally and intellectually. And I believe that God will hold me accountable for what I do with those words.

Writing is not a game or a therapeutic hobby. It is a powerful stewardship.

People who might not spend much–or any–time in a Bible, might read one of my books. I must shape more stories so that light shines out and helps them see a path to truth…to redemption…to God.

What stories to you think our society needs hear today?

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Ambassadors for God!

     So far we have looked at the “Writer’s Prayer” and seen that writing Christian fiction (or any Christian writing) comes out of an intimate relationship with God. We can know the One that we’re writing about. Then we spent time considering the importance of remembering. May we, as Christian writers, never forget the privilege and responsibility of telling God’s story in the books that we write. And in my last post, we focused our thoughts on the first petition in the Writer’s Prayer: Dear God, help me remember WHO I am, for I’M YOUR CHILD. If you haven’t read the earlier posts, please take time to scroll down and do so.  

     The second request in the “Writer’s Prayer” is this: Dear God, help me remember WHAT I am, for I’m YOUR AMBASSADOR.

     Paul expressed the same idea in II Corinthians 5:20: “…we are ambassadors for Christ, as though God were entreating through us: we beg you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God.”

     An ambassador represents someone in authority. In this case, Christian writer’s must never forget that we represent Almighty God. We are on a mission to spread the good news. We have the incredible honor of writing stories that lead the lost and feed the saved. In a real sense, we are instruments of God. God calls us to tell stories that offer light in the midst of darkness, truth instead of error, hope in place of despair. Writing for God is serious business indeed. We’ve been entrusted with a unique and sacred stewardship. Old Testament Prophets used the power of story to deliver God’s message. Even our Lord used stories to get His points across.

     Ours is a mission of peace, and truth. We get to write stories that point people to the greatest peace treaty ever made–and it was signed in the blood of Christ. Because of that we can craft stories of faith, hope, and love. We can tell stories of redemption and forgiveness. And we can expose readers to the truths of scripture in engaging and memorable ways. Not only can we, we MUST.    

     Is there anything greater that representing the Living Word with our written words? Isn’t it inspiring when God uses what we write to draw someone to a deeper or renewed relationship with Him? Perhaps even help a reader come to know Christ for the first time? WOW!

     But I must remember this is about Him. It’s His story for His glory. He didn’t call me to write to make me a star. Don’t get me wrong, I want my books to be published, and purchased by as many people as possible.  But that’s because I believe I have something important to write about.

     I’m an ambassador for Christ, and so are you. Not because we are writers, but because we are Christians. Writing is one great way to spread the good news. Who are you writing for?

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